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Posts Tagged ‘Homophone’


Before y’all go throwing stones at me, my disclaimer is as follows:

I am fluent in American English. I am familiar with British and Canadian English, but not fluent, since I was raised in the US.

As such, if you find my perspective to be off, please leave me a comment with a link to information so I can broaden my horizons.

Now. Onto the subject.

Today’s subject is brough to you by the letter H, as in homophones.

In a nutshell, homophones are words that sound the same but have different spellings and meanings.

Here are a few examples:

Deer and dear.

Fair and fare.

Seem and seam.

(And before you go all grammar police-y on me, yes, I know those up there are fragments!)

One of the things I’ve seen around lately is the issue of the word ‘copyright.’ I have seen it spelled ‘copywrite’ a lot lately, and I’m befuddled.

Here in the US, you get a copyright for your work. The symbol looks like this: ©

This is a copyRIGHT because you have the rights to your copy; or the words you’ve written (or other intellectual property).

As far as I can determine, there is no actual word ‘copywrite’ in the dictionary, although copywriters would be those that write copy, as in “A person who writes the text of advertisements or publicity material.”

So. Now that we’re clear- you can’t copywrite the stuff you write. You can, however, copyright it, and really, everyone should- unless you don’t think someone would ever borrow your words without permission and are 150% sure.

For more information on copyrights in the US, go to the US Copyright Office and start there. The FAQs are very helpful.

If you live in other countries, please leave me a comment about how you get a copyright in your country, and what it’s called.

If you’ve nothing better to do and need to kill some time, check out the List of British English Homophones and have a great time. 🙂

Now that I’ve got that out of my system, I can go back to being aggravated over spelling and usage of other homophones like you’re and your, to and too, there, they’re and their……….. 😆

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