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Archive for the ‘Horses’ Category


I think I mentioned it before, but when you live on a farm, there are never-ending things to do, even if you aren’t actually farming. 😉

You may recall that when we moved, we ended up with 5 abandoned horses in our front yard. A few months later, we did the horsey shuffle. It actually was remarkably like the Hokey Pokey, but with horses. At the end of the day, no one had gotten really injured and we all still had our teeth, so that was a win. 😆 And our roster was set.

Around Thanksgiving, our kitty went missing. We later discovered her deceased. 😦 When her brother had to be put down for intestinal cancer, we had gotten Little Dog. As luck would have it, a short-haired border collie became available from a gentleman who used them with his cattle and had gotten a large amount from a breeder/trainer friend of his who decided he was too old and passed on his border collie ‘stock.’ Anyhow. Puppy was the runt of the litter and he felt would be too small to handle the cattle, so he was trying to find her a good home. We got her the next day.

Christmas rolled around, and we were still missing having a cat. I don’t think in the last 20+ years we’ve gone very long without some kind of cat. We like our kittens in pairs. Then chicken math hit, and we got three babies from the same litter. {Actually, I have a whole category on Chicken Math………… :lol:} That’s how we ended up with Los Tres Amigos.

At some point, we had a lovely orange kitty come and visit us for several months. He’s actually been over at our horse trainer‘s house for the last several weeks. I wonder if he got tired of the dogs barking at him. We hope he comes back because we miss him………

Then we got the bantams and I ordered my large fowl and guineas. 😀

Two weeks ago, my newly “adopted” 19 year-old daughter/neighbor came by on her way home from the vet’s office where she worked. Someone had dumped off a litter of 4 kittens to be put down. Well, there was no way she was going to let that happen! So she took them home. Seeing as the little girls were outside, she thought she’d stop and show them the babies.

When she left a while later, she had one kitten with her. 😆 We kept the other 3 3-week-old kitties. So, we’ve been busy bottle feeding, ect. I had no idea that when they are that little, you need to stimulate them to go to the bathroom. 😯

Because the other kitties became solely indoor kitties, we are thinking these will be our barn kitties. I’ve got some great pics in with the other kitties and today in with the chicks. Hilarious!

This morning, the post office called at 6:15 am to let me know my chickies were here. I was back home around 7 am with all live chickies!!! ♥♥♥

{And you wonder why I’m not writing much…………….  :lol:}

We’re missing guineas, which will come next month.

Don’t laugh or roll your eyes, but here’s what we have right now:

3 dogs

5 horses

6.5 cats

14 bantams

40 large fowl

4 kids

2 completely crazy parents; {one obviously more crazy than the other 😉 }

And a partridge in a pear tree. {No, not really, silly- not yet, anyhow. 😉 } 😆

Because y’all have been so patient with me, here are some pictures. I’ve added a category for Around the Farm stuff, which will probably end up being mostly pictures. You’ve been warned! 😀

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Herman

Herman

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Spawn of Herman?

Spawn of Herman?

Go Navy!

Go Navy!

Creepy quiet those are- didn't bother the horses and the dogs never even barked!

Creepy quiet those are- didn’t bother the horses and the dogs never even barked!

Fog rolls in an hovers over the fields.

Fog rolls in and hovers over the fields.

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How many horses do you see?

How many horses do you see?

From the balcony off the bedroom.

From the balcony off the bedroom.

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Finally enough weight to be ridden!

Finally enough weight to be ridden!

My girl. ♥

My girl. ♥

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So there you have it- a taste of 6 months on the farm! 😀

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Yep.

Stop. It.

What’s got my knickers in a twist?

Soring. That’s what.

A year ago- heck- 6 months ago, I would have thought that this was a mis-spelling of what large birds do when they are flying.

The extent of our horsey knowledge was that they were expensive {especially in the desert, where they can’t graze} and that there was BIG money in racing. I had heard that there was a lot of money in the show horse world, but I never had cause to really think about any of it.

And then we moved, and had abandoned horses in our front yard.

That led to the decision to get horses for those that want to ride. A friend of ours came across a posting through an equine rescue group for a Spotted Saddle Horse. And then, the one gal with the rescue sent our friend info on a Tennessee Walking Horse.

We fell in love, and were totally, completely hooked.

We sent both girls down the road {literally, not even a mile away} for training, where they stayed for a month and we all got trained. Mostly.

We knew our SSH had issues with being trailered. We came to figure out that she had been a show horse, which instantly put her into hyper-speed when the bit when in her mouth. It also accounted for the tail with the cut tendon, to make her tail stay up a bit higher.

Our TWH, on the other hand, trailered just fine, but continued to test every single person who sat on her. And, she was/is bossy and pushy in the pasture. We think she had also been shown, thanks to her “pimp walk.”

This is a hard one to describe, because people look at you like you are nuts when you try to describe it. It’s like she has a broken leg.

Now, some people think an unusual gait is fun, {why else would they have trained her to do it?!}, but we don’t like it. At. All.

This is one of those things we’ve been working hard to correct.

We’re not getting very far riding them outside the paddock, either, because they are hopped up when the bits go in and retraining has taken some time.

To this end, we are transitioning them to use hackamores. I think we are making some progress.

I started researching, because, well, that’s just the way I roll.

And then I learned about soring, and it got me to thinking.

Our SSH, Magic, has uber sensitive feet. We thought she was ticklish. Now, I’m not so sure. I wonder if she has nerve damage.

Before I go any further, I need to warn you that these pictures and information are graphic and disturbing. Because it’s important, I feel a need to get it out there.

What is soring?

According to the Human Society,

“Soring involves the intentional infliction of pain to a horse’s legs or hooves in order to force the horse to perform an artificial, exaggerated gait. Caustic chemicals—blistering agents like mustard oil, diesel fuel, and kerosene—are applied to the horse’s limbs, causing extreme pain and suffering.”

Here are a few pictures.

soring1

soring2

soring3

soring4

The point of soring is to make them pick their feet up really high, for the Big Lick gait.

Lest you think this is an isolated incident, there have been recent arrests made; one top trainer in addition to a person who was on the ethics board for this breed.

I’m naming names.

Last September, Hall of Fame trainer Jackie McConnell was fined and banned for life because of soring and booted out of the Hall of Fame. Did his punishment go far enough? In my opinion, no.

$75,000 is not NEARLY enough, in my opinion, for the decades of torture he caused these horses, not to mention the profit he made in the show ring.

Last week, April 25, 19 horses were seized in a barn used by Larry Wheelon. Mr. Wheelon is an is an active director of the Tennessee Walking Horse Trainer’s Association and sits on its ethics committee. You can read about the warrant here.

Watch the videos.

They are graphic, but you NEED to see them to get a glimmer of what this is all about.

[youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DMUbnBo0xw%5D

The Human Society video is one that I haven’t been able to sit all the way through. I absolutely just cannot get through it.

If you’ve ever been on the other side of a rescued horse, you might know what I’m talking about.

One of the previous owners threw a hammer at her (our SSH), too.

I suspect that my horse may have been subjected to some of this. Even if she wasn’t, she is, nonetheless, traumatized. There is no other explanation for the way she freaks out when getting trailered, or how you can see the fear in her eyes when the bit goes in her mouth.

We’ve been told numerous times that a horse you can’t ride eats just as much as a horse you can ride. There’s truth to that.

We’re not ready to give up, though. The more I read, watch, and learn, the more I feel like we absolutely were sent here for these horses- not just the abandoned ones, but the ones we’ve rescued.

While I admit to getting frustrated because I’d like to be further along than we are, this kind of information fortifies my resolve.

So, what can you do? Not everyone can foster or rehabilitate an abused or neglected horse. You can, however, find a 501 c3 non-profit equine rescue. You might even find one that specializes in Tennessee Walking Horses/Spotted Saddle Horses or other gaited horses that have been victimized for the show ring.

One rescue I’ve found is called the Sore No More Ranch, and it specializes in Tennessee Walking Horses that have been victims of soring.

The Wounded Heart Center is another that specializes in treatment and rehabilitation.

Habitat For Horses has a lot of good information, too.{I haven’t found anything on this website that says it’s a non-profit- if someone can find it, please post the link in a comment and I’ll edit this post.}

The bottom line is this: Soring HAS TO STOP.

Help spread the word. Donate funds to an equine rescue. Rescue a horse if you’re able. Spread the word and contact your legislators asking them NOT to support the Ag bill that punishes abuse whistleblowers. You can get read more about that issue on the Human Society  and ASPCA websites.

Get involved.

Do. Something.

You CAN make a diffference!

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Most days start the same {we wake up}. Most days end the same {we go to bed}.

It’s the stuff in between that can take your day from a well-planned, uneventful day, to  total chaos a day filled with unplanned learning opportunities.

Yep.

You know where I’m going with this, don’t you? But, at this point, you are going down the checklist of possibilities; trying to figure out which is most likely.

Kids.

Kittens.

Puppy.

Dogs.

Horses.

Chicks.

What’s your guess?

If you took “Horses for $100, Alex,” you’d be right.

Blech.

So, I was folding my laundry in my room, and getting my day all lined out, all nice and quiet like, and then I heard the herd of elephants stampede.

Those of you who think only cattle can stampede haven’t had more than a single horse………….  😆

One thing to know about horses is that they get wound up when the barometric pressure changes.

Want to know if a storm is coming in? Check your arthritis or find some horses. Either of those will tell you.

We knew there was a storm blowing in, so we weren’t really surprised to find that everyone was sure feeling their oats this morning. {No, don’t worry, we don’t actually feed them that…}

It was cold, and the wind had started to pick up a bit.

Breakfast was, overall, uneventful. Once they eat, we turn them out into the big pasture. Normally, this is a relatively calm event…………..

So, anyhow, I’m upstairs, folding my laundry, mapping out my day. I needed to take Cookie Monster doggy to the vet to get her stitches from her spay taken out. After that, I needed to get back to the painting.

And then Magic went flying by, and I heard the stampede. I couldn’t see anyone but Magic, but I figured they were getting it out of their systems before the precipitation came.

And then I heard the door slam shut and the pounding of feet up the stairs.

The report, as it were, was that Boi had fallen and Angel had run into something. They thought there might be injuries.

“Well, go and check and then let me know,” I said, as I continued folding my laundry. “I am making good time this morning,” I thought, “I’ll be able to get to the vet and back by lunch.”

The door slammed again and an even faster pounding of feet came up the stairs.

“Angel hit her face and is bleeding all over!”

With instructions to go catch her, I flew around, changing my sweats into jeans and grabbing my hoodie. I texted Hunny on the way down, so he would have a head’s up.

WARNING! GRAPHIC PICTURES WITH BLOOD!

I didn’t want you to be caught off-guard.

Where was I?

Oh yes. I was headed into the pasture.

When I got there, this is what I saw:

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You have probably figured out by now that I don’t really panic. I am pretty good at assessing the situation and determining what needs to happen.

As a rule, my kids freak out and think that everything is way worse than what it is.

This, however, falls into the category of “Absolutely Needs To Have Sutures.”

I don’t suture. 🙂

Nope, that is one of those things I feel the need to leave to the professionals because, well, they have the right drugs to go along with the experience. 😆

I was in the pasture and called the vet’s office, once I realized I didn’t have her cell phone number. Somehow, that number didn’t make it into my phone, and I couldn’t send her a picture to her pager.

The vet’s office texted me her number, and I texted her the picture.

Yepper, she’d be out today. She was currently in a barn full of horses, getting ready for the showing season. She would call me within the hour to let me know what time she’d be able to get here this afternoon, after she had finished with the others.

I should have time to head to the doggie vet while she was figuring it out.

I dashed into the house and got the puppy ready to go. Little dog is a riot, and every time we go, she wants to go, too, even to the vet.  It just means more barking when we get there, but she loves to ride in the car, unlike Cookie Monster who is always seriously soaked from her drool in the car.

So. Middle daughter J stayed outside with her horse to help keep her calm. Oldest daughter J went with me to the vet.

On the way home, the vet, K, called to let us know she was on her way. Daughter J texted Hunny, who was going to head home and meet us.

As it turns out, when she got the picture, the owner of the other horses saw it, too, and took pity on us. They had 2 horses sedated already, so they told K that as soon as she got done with them, they could finish the other horses another day, and please, could she go put our horse’s face back together sooner?

Isn’t that awesome?! The horse community is astonishingly welcoming and giving; at least the folks we’ve met.

We love our vets! This is the same vet that came and gelded Boi in the side pasture, so we were familiar with her style under {our} stress.

After some evaluation, she agreed that while Angel needed to be stitched back together, her eye was probably ok. She’d know more once she got to cleaning and working on fixing her back up.

The first step was to sedate Angel. Then she got to work shaving the area.

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After she cleaned, it was time to prepare and numb the area so she could get to suturing it back together.

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Did you do a double-take on this picture? 🙂 Are you now thinking we’re being barbaric with our cruel and unusual punishment of this poor horse?

Actually, there is a method to the madness……… this handle thingy is called a twitch. It’s wrapped up in her upper lip because there is a pressure point that will stimulate the release of endorphins, which helps the horse with pain. You gently rock the twitch, which releases the endorphins so that the stick of the needle won’t hurt as much.

I think that is awesome!

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Just a wee little bit longer, and the anesthetized, clean wound was ready for the stitching.

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Ta da! All done!

That last little bit needed a few staples, which we’ll have taken out in a few weeks unless they work themselves out in the meantime.

Whew. I love our vet(s), but I’d rather not have to see her like this.

I especially appreciate her willingness to explain absolutely everything she’s doing, including the anatomy and the whys of what she’s doing. She talks in terms that are clinical, yet are easy for us to understand. She has always answered the kids’ questions, and chuckles as they tell their stories.

She even took the time to show us the skull fracture; the bone bruise, and explain why we’re watching for what we’re watching for. She doesn’t think that there will be any problems with the healing, but if there are, we know where it will be.

Once she left, I stayed outside, wrapping the electrical lines connected to the poles in neon orange tape so they are more visible. We are going to cut up some pool noodles and give the lines some padding this weekend, but the tape should help in the meantime.

Now it’s evening, and the girls are out feeding. I need to go help with hay, and then I’m going to go put my feet up.

What did you do today? 😀

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Yep. I think I might be certifiable. chickencuckoo

I spent yesterday in bed. I am pretty sure old people like me are not made to bounce off the ground. I’m going to be really bruised, but the upside is that I didn’t break a collar-bone or an arm or a leg or my spine.

I can say that not only am I not cut out for getting bucked off horses, I may not even be cut out to ride them. We’ll see.

We did a change in strategy over the weekend. I just didn’t have it in me yesterday to fight.

So, because I didn’t sleep last night worth a hill o’ beans because I was too sore, I did what most people would assume I would do: I went for a run.

After nearly 6 months off, I figured I was so pea pickin’ sore that I might as well tackle it now, so the new soreness will be absorbed by the stuff that’s already here. I’m pretty sure the turkeys across the road could have lapped me had they wanted to, as slowly as I was going.

Nonetheless, I got 3 miles in. While I’ve had a have a hard time lifting my arms the last two days, I figured my legs should be ok.  Any new aches I’m going to get will just have to join the others……………

Ya. Pretty sure I’m crazy. 😯

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Sorry, but I’m pretty sure there’s not. It’s probably a futile effort, but I’m going to try anyhow. You can thank me later. 😀

“What’s this?” you might be wondering.

A summary, that’s what. I am pretty sure that I can’t summarize what all has happened since I last wrote, but I’ll try. You’ll most assuredly get the Cliff’s Notes version, full of stuff that I didn’t forget to include. 😀 Hopefully, you’ll enough of the gist to pass the test at the end.

When I last bored you with my drivel, we had just moved 7 horses in a single day.

Magic, Angel, Halo, Blondie and Doodlebug {formerly known as Elia} all went down the road to our friend’s house. As a trainer, her goals were to make sure we could ride both Angel and Magic. Halo needed to continue gaining weight, and Doodlebug needed to be weaned.

Score on all of the above points, more or less. I say more or less, because Magic and Angel both have attitudes, and there have been days where we couldn’t even ride because they were too squirrely. {And yes, I DO know it’s mostly us and not them ………….. :lol:} Combined with an uncontrolled full-out gallop back to the paddock resulting in throwing off my oldest daughter and having her arm stepped on, we can 100% say that a drug drop makes us really stressed out which in turn stresses out the horse and can be a less-than-ideal situation. Ya. Really.

Anyhow.

Horses have been trained, and we’re taking it one day at a time. I am not giving up.

I have, however, learned that show horses and rescue horse, like other rescue animals, come with their own sets of learned behaviors that may or may not be conducive to trail riding.  You might have figured out by now that we’re a particularly stubborn kind of folk, that, while listening to thoughts, opinions, and recommendations of others, may or may not take said advice. We’ll take it all under advisement, but at the end of the day, we’re going to do what we’re going to do.

Clearly, there is a learning curve, but if we’re in for a penny; we’re in for a pound. And there are *lots* of pennies involved here.

Since moving day, all the horses have had the farrier come and do their feet. Boi, for the first time, and Flicka in who knows how many years- both did well, all things being equal. And the day the farrier came, Boi had gotten gelded.

Yep. He did. Right out in the side pasture, our awesome vet laid him down, took off his parts, and off we went on our merry way. Because she didn’t suture, there was no concern about ripping his sutures open to lift his legs for the farrier. We also trotted him the following days as told, to keep him draining.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago, and all the girls came home. Boi was thrilled to see his love and mother of his children, Halo, and didn’t waste any time mounting her since she was in heat.

Much to his disappointment {after numerous times trying}, as you can imagine, he was unable to complete his business. He hasn’t tried again since that we’ve seen, but he’s been in a pretty foul mood until we separated him out from the girls and started spending a lot of time with him again.

Where do we go from here? I’m not sure.

We are planning on riding again today, since we haven’t put in a whole lot of time since the runaway episode over a week ago. We’re giving them time to adjust. I’m hoping getting back into riding consistently will get Angel to stop cribbing and air/wind sucking. Honestly, she is not bored and is not lonely and is not stabled; we’ll get it figured out.

Halo has taken to getting picky with what she eats. I guess since she’s not starving anymore, she figures she can let her particular palete run wild.

In the meantime, not a lot of painting has gotten done. We’ve had a visit from my parents who had to laugh at the chaos that is 5 horses, 3 dogs and 3 kittens and 4 children.

While the girls were being trained, not only were we heading over to feed twice a day, but most days we were there for training as well. Add to this that during this time, we still had heating contractors in and out on a weekly basis, it’s not an understatement to say it was chaotic.

I have to say, it was *awesome* having the ability to be present for 98% of the training and see what was happening. Depositing a horse off for training and then picking them up at the end of a month is not the kind of training that settles well with me. Clearly, I am too much of a control freak. 😀

Those few weeks, we were feeding 15 horses twice a day. It was all-consuming. We were not home a whole lot. Since you already know that I’m a hermit an introvert, you can imagine what kind of state I ended up in. And I got sick, which is probably no surprise.

Out of everything, I have gotten to the point where I realize the deep-seated need for running and getting back into more of a normal routine. I probably won’t be doing my 8 miles a day for a while, because painting still looms, but I have to find the balance, because my body is revolting against me. My pain level has been consistently higher lately, which tells me I need to get off my rear and get back at it. No matter how much a person tries to not to think about it, chronic illness simply will not be ignored.

In the midst of this, Hunny has managed to get most of the office put together, which I’m hoping means a return to more active writing. Goodness knows, I’ve needed it.

The underlying, recurring theme as I bang my head with the horse stuff is this: “All I wanted were chickens…………..”

So. Let’s recap, shall we?

Horses got moved out. Boi got gelded. Girls got moved back home. Magic and Angel have been giving attitude. Painting has been slow going. Office has been mostly put back together. Unpacking still looms. Despite the horsey issues, no one has gotten seriously hurt {praise God!} and we continue on our merry way of sticking to our plan, which may be sheer folly.

Because you got the edited version, the following test will completely consist of identifying each horse by name. {No cheating by looking at the caption! :lol:}

Horse #1

parked out

Boi

Boi

Flicka

Flicka

Halo and Elia

Halo and Elia

Who’s first? 😀

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It was not entirely unexpected, but it happened a bit fast. We knew this day was coming, but I’ll admit I was completely stressed out about it.

Tonight, I look out and see a lonely 2 horses left in our front pasture. However, we own at least 5. They just aren’t here. 😦 😦

2 days ago, our good friend D called to let me know about another horse opportunity. This was not another rescue; just an awesome opportunity. D and T were going to be in the general area anyhow, and they had 2 horses, 1 pony, and a puppy to go see. They took a saddle and promised to send pictures.

In the meantime, we made a mad dash to Tractor Supply to check on fencing.

The original pre- Thursday plan was to move all the horses. Gone. All 5 of them. Kapoof.

As seems to be par for the course, things changed moment by moment. We had hard decisions to make. And. It. Was. STRESSFUL.

Saddlebreds are a hot-blooded breed. Numerous people told us these two horses would never be good for riding; that we could never control them on the trail because of the breed. The mixes- Saddlebred/Quarter Horse were even worse.

And yet, we knew our two Saddlebreds. We knew how calm they could be; how gentle. We made HUGE leaps with both Flicka and Boi, and probably decisions that weren’t the smartest at the time, like saddling Boi just to see if we could do it. {He was completely calm, by the way, even when we tightened the cinch (or cinched the girth; whichever you prefer 😀 ); he did not even move- and really, we don’t need more of a lecture; we get it. 🙂 }

The tipping point was when we decided to go for the new horse. Where were we going to put everyone?

Halo needs to be fattened up more; Elia {we’ve been calling him Jambalaya because he’s a jumbled mess :lol:} needs to be weaned. We’re undecided what to do with Blondie because we’re not sure she would ever be a good horse for trail riding, and she’s a ways off from being able to be ridden. So, we’re going to give it some time and see what we want to down the road.

Magic needs some attitude work, but she is still an awesome horse. Angel, however, is pretty near perfect. She needs some saddle hours and a thorough evaluation to make sure she is completely child-safe. She already parks out, which means shorty me can probably get on without a bench.

parked out

Magic and Angel got moved first, and that went very well. Then it was time to head home and move the others.

Halo went right in {incidentally, she went back to her first home and original trainer} and Elia followed right away. We had some shuffling around and baby came out and then we had a little bit of work to get him back in. Once they were secured, it was time to get Blondie loaded.

Have you ever tried to trailer a wild filly for the first time? No? Us either. 😆

And let me tell you, that was a lot of work! Obviously, I didn’t get any pictures. It took us about an hour, but we got her.

In addition to moving our horses, D and S (the gal who drove the trailer to get Magic) were doing a horse swap over at his place. By the time he and S got back, Blondie was loaded and we were ready to go.

Horses got settled in and then we came back home for tack. At some point, he called and let us know the Saddlebred “people” were on their way. So home we went. This was going to be the make-or-break decision time. And we were dreading it…………….

At the end of the day, we’re trying to track down registration on Flicka to see what she’s been trained to do. As we thought, she had been broken and most likely shown and can even park out, although she basically needs to relearn everything.

Boi has bonded with our oldest daughter. He is a *completely* different horse when she handles him, and he does very well with Hunny and me, too.

They are both still here, and we’re going to get him gelded before sending them off to Saddlebred camp  training. We realize these two are our project horses, but we are cautiously optimistic.

I really believe God brought us *here*- to this house; to this property; with these horses. I think we were supposed to save them. We realize it may not work out the way we want it to, but we really feel like we owe them a chance. It’s not their fault they were abandoned and ignored. We’re willing to give them a chance and see where we land. And, of course, we are totally attached to them and we love them, so that helps. 😀

We really just want everyone home, and we’re working towards that goal as quickly as we can. Within the next several weeks, we hope to have the horses home and also get our chicken arrangements underway. Even with all our horsey fun, I miss my girlies!

So. That’s what we did today. 😀 Have we’ve graduated from being chicken people to horse people to full-out farm folk? I think just maybe we’re getting there…………………………

And I wouldn’t have it any other way!

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Do you believe in magic? I think I might……………………….

It was purely an accident, us becoming horse people. This wasn’t something we set out to do; yet here we are.

And we are loving it!

It didn’t take us long to figure out that horses are awesome. And then we started looking at our land and coming up with ideas. In a perfect world, everyone who wants to ride would have a horse. At some point, that means lots and lots of fencing redos.

In a perfect world, we’d get the surrounding land {and barns} and we would just have to deal with repair, instead of making new and also clearing some land to accommodate all the horses.

I’m not sure we’re living in a perfect world just yet, but we are still working on it.

The abandoned horses are doing well, all things considered. We’ve gotten halters on all 3 of them, including the two Saddlebreds. We’ve learned that Flicka has been ridden, which we assumed she had been, given her price tag. It’s just going to take a bit of time and effort to get her back to where she was years ago. When horses have been abandoned for so long, it takes a bit to get them trusting people again.

I’m thinking I might need a new category; you know, a “Ooops, I did it again” category. We seem to keep falling into those kinds of situations. 😆

For example, we’re not really set up just yet for horses. You may have learned by now that some of the best things we end up with are not planned, and come on a totally different time-table than we had been thinking of.

Yep. You guessed it- we got a horse. Another horse. That actually belongs to us. 😀

Just over a week ago, I got a phone call from our friend D. He knew of a horse that was being given back to the Diamonds in the Rough Equine Rescue group. The horse was *exactly* the kind we were looking for, and even better, the price tag was unbelievable. She was totally trained and vetted, with a clean bill of health. Did we want her?

I started emailing Hunny, and D sent me some pictures. !!!!!!!!!

By the end of the day, we had it worked out to go get her in Va early the next day. We loaded up the next morning, and off we went, in the rainy cold.

Several hours later, we were home, and getting Magic settled in. It was a rough start; she had been moved around several times in the previous days prior, and was a bit stressed out. We were counting on her being trained the way she was promoted, despite her having gotten loose and having a little bit of a challenge to get her trailered.

But she doesn’t live here yet, because I have a stallion in my front yard that needs to get dealt with so he’s not jumping fences trying to get nookie. Our fantastic friend down the road is letting us house our girl there until we get fencing and get the situation with Boi settled. He’s going to get sick of us, because we’re there twice a day now, for both feedings.

Yesterday, many of us went Magic riding. Well, sort of. We rode around while being tethered to the lunge line.

When you get a new horse and you don’t know much about them, you have to figure out their cues. Obviously, since we’re new to horses, we’re pretty much clueless. Thank goodness for our awesome neighbors!

Because she was a breed that D hadn’t dealt much with personally, he called his neighbor, T, to come on over. She helped figure out Magic’s cues, and we’ve come to the conclusion she was a show horse.

Several things lead us to this thinking. Her tail has a tendon cut so she’ll hold her tail higher, and she primarily uses finger cues for steering. In some ways, I’m glad we’re all “learning” on her!

This is our Magic. She’s a Spotted Saddle Horse and is double registered; also as a Tennessee Walking Horse.

Magic1

Do you believe in Magic? We do! 😆

Because life is a soundtrack, there’s no doubt you know where I’m going with this…….here’s the Lovin’ Spoonful!

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaqRwFyoGgQ%5D

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