Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Book Sneeze’ Category


Book Description

C.R. Chapman investigates the Book of Revelation as an end time prophecy with HOPE and, through the use of numerous examples, charts, and references, presents readers with enlightening, analytical, meaningful and scriptural understanding of the many signs and symbolisms in this ancient holy text. Many of the warnings and events of End Time prophecy are in the form of symbolism which Chapman has methodically and diligently examined in Apocalyptic Tremors. The images of the seal period crown justice. The vengeance of Christ hears the cries of the martyrs. How can the four living creatures represent the apostate church and the true church? What on earth can the Korah Rebellion have in common with the Apocalypse? What are the two woes of ironic justice? Warfare or demon possession – which is worse? The “Qol” of the Day of the Lord brings judgment and indignation in forty-five days. In one day, history is buried beneath the bells engraved, “Holiness to the Lord.” The most exclusive and distinctive symbol to Apocalyptic Tremors is the Harvest Rapture which reflects ancient past and mirrors tomorrow’s future hope. The trump sounds and kingdoms fall; yet, HOPE prevails. There is purpose in tribulation where patience wins. The rewards of justice complete every covenant of God to the Jews and the Church.

My Review

I’m usually able to look for the positives in books, but this one leaves me struggling. This title was extremely difficult for me to get through. I felt like the author said the same things over and over and over again and found myself wondering why the book was as long as it was, because all of the material had been covered repeatedly.

Now, it could be true that I don’t know enough about the subject to “get” what the author was trying to do. What I do know to be true, however, is that when references are used, it’s better to go with actual published resources as opposed to, say, a blog and other resources on the internet. While I appreciate Father Joe’s blog, I, personally, would have looked for another printed or at least an “official” Church position on the kissing of the Koran by Pope John Paul II.

In addition, there should have been an explanation of which bible was used for reference. Maccabees 1 and 2 were used as references. The Protestant Bible doesn’t have the same chapters as the Catholic Bible and therefore doesn’t include either of the books of the Maccabees. Had I not known this, I would have been completely lost as to what that reference was.

One thing I can’t completely speak to were the graphics and charts used. Because I got an e-book, these were completely lost to me. Most of them had an entire side missing and those that were visible had such small font that even a magnifying glass wouldn’t have helped much (changing the font size does not affect graphic size on my Kindle). And, there were typos. In a few places, I noticed a repeat of actual text. I have no idea if this is specific to the electronic format or not, but it didn’t help my impression.

I would not recommend this title. Even without having done other studies on this particular subject, I am sure there are other studies and resources that are better out there. Truthfully, if I wasn’t reviewing this title, I would have abandoned it early on. I give it 2 stars out of 5, mostly because I’ve read other books that had more typos and misspelled words.

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Read Full Post »


Book Description

Rachel and Jordan’s feelings for each other are hostile at first, but angelic intervention helps the two discover peace . . . and perhaps love. 

The youngest and last unmarried of four sisters, Rachel Hartlzer spends most of her time helping with barn chores. Her role abruptly changes when her father hires Jordan Engles, the son he always wanted.

As Jordan takes on brotherly roles around the house, like escorting Rachel to the youth singing, the enmity between the two grows. Besides, Jordan has one foot in the Englisch world and is determined not to get involved with an Amish girl.

Neither realizes that God has sent an angel, Nathaniel, to help mend their hearts. The angel’s intervention helps them find peace and healing in accepting God’s will for their lives.

 

My Review

I have to say, this title was right up my alley. If you’ve read any of my other reviews, you’ve no doubt figured out that I generally enjoy Amish fiction.

This book is Amish fiction with a twist. 🙂

Rachel is doing just fine helping her daed on the farm. Since her brother James’ death, she’s trying to ease her guilt, all the while staying away from the mundane tasks of cooking and sewing unmarried women of her age are usually afflicted with.

When Jordan unexpectedly enters the picture, Rachel is angry, being replaced by this interloper. He’s not even Amish! And her father is calling him sohn!

At 20 years old, Rachel is pretty sure she’s going to remain unmarried. She can’t cook anything edible, and her stitching and sewing abilities leave the wearer looking lopsided. She would much rather be out in the barn with the animals or out in the fields with her daed.

Jordan’s intrusion into her life leaves her conflicted. He’s not Amish, and not completely Englisch. Either way it doesn’t matter, because he’s not staying.

When tragedy strikes again, Jordan is long gone. Rachel finds herself in a situation she could never have expected, and she’s not sure she wants.

Can they find their true paths in life before it’s too late?

This is a really nice story of love, tragedy, redemption, soul-searching, all amidst a backdrop of the war of good vs. evil. This was the debut effort from this author, and I’m excited to read the other titles that are planned for this series.

I give this book 5 out of 5 stars. I’ll definitely recommend this to friends I know that are interested in Amish fiction.

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with    the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255    <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides   Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Read Full Post »


This is kind of a combination post; book review and additional thoughts. Scroll down past the legal disclaimer to read the rest.

 

Book Description

December 1941 traces, day-by-day, the most important 31 days in the history of America’s participation in WWII, which snuffed out the lives of millions and changed history forever.

From December 1, 1941, until the morning of December 7, 1941, America was at peace and—with the exception of the stubborn and persistent high unemployment of the Great Depression—was a relatively happy country. By the afternoon of the December 7 attack on Pearl Harbor, America was a radically changed country, forever. Its isolationist impulses evaporated, and both major political parties became more or less internationalist. The month also introduced food and gas rationing, Victory Gardens, scrap drives, a military draft, and the conversion of Detroit into an “arsenal of democracy.” From the moment of America’s entry into World War II, people of all kinds, but mostly women looking for work, flooded into the city. Instant apartment buildings sprang up, as did eating and drinking salons, all to the advantage of the massive increase in spending generated by the federal government.

December 1941 is a fascinating and meticulously researched look at the American home front—her people, faith, economy, government, and culture.

“Craig Shirley’s December 1941 is a riveting narrative history of America in the crucible of the Second World War. A real page turner. Highly recommended.” –Douglas Brinkley, Professor of History at Rice University and New York Times bestseller of The Wilderness Warrior.

My Review

This is not the book for people who are short on time or just want an overview of the events of December 1941. To date, this title took me longer to read than any other book I can remember. Ever.

Normally, I’m not keen on books that drag on and on and take significant amounts of time to get through. This was not a title that kept me hanging on the edge of my seat- I assume this is because we already know what happened that horrible month, so there wasn’t a push to stay up and find out what happened next.

In hindsight, I would have really loved having this book as a hard copy. I thought I was making bookmarks on my Kindle, but apparently none of them stuck. And that is really disappointing, because there is some really good stuff in there!

What’s unique about this book is the scope. The author literally took headlines from newspapers and publications from around the world, and infused the them and content exerpt into this book. The result is a comprehensive look at the world at the time; rich with anecdotes, like

“Americans dressed up in suits and ties and dresses to go to the movies. Everyone wore hats, and they always put on their “Sunday best” to go to church, out to dinner, to take a train or an airplane. The whole idea was to make people think better of you as an individual;” 

“FM radio was not unheard of in 1941, just very expensive; an FM radio could cost as much as $390, more than most people’s wages in one month; ”

“Everyone smoked cigarettes in 1941, and everybody smoked cigarettes everywhere. In the movie theaters, in restaurants, on airplanes, in trains, at sporting events, at the office, even in the classrooms, Americans smoked ’em if they had ’em……………The average American in 1940 consumed 2,558 cigarettes, double that of ten years earlier, ”

and

“A cartoon in the Greeley (Co) Daily Tribune women’s page depicted a beat-up young woman, one eye blackened, head bandaged, and sporting a broken arm as she cheerily told three friends, “My boyfriend always starts a little spat just before Christmas.” But dozens of tamer cartoon strips were enjoyed by American parens and children. “Li’l Abner,” about a hayseed in Dog Patch; “Alley Oop,” a cave man in present times; “Blondie,” a ditsy wife and her equally ditsy husband Dagwood; “Prince Valiant,” a knight of the Round Table; and “Bringing up Father,” about Jiggs and Maggie, two socialites seemingly caught up in the time warp of 1922.”

Can you see why I got hooked? I honestly don’t remember the last book I read that I sank so completely into. I can’t imagine the amount of time it took the author to research this, but the end result was well, well worth it.

Some have said that this felt like a sports cast, with a play-by-play being announced. I won’t go that route, but I will say the comprehensive look at what was happening in the US and around the world left me feeling like *I* was in a time warp, and had been transported to that time.

The research that went into this book is simply astounding. Each chapter was a day of the month, and as I was nearing the end of the month, I was still only about 60% of the way through the book. Fully 35% of this title was reference and footnotes. That’s what I’m talking about, when I say this is a comprehensive overview of the world at-large during this month. Astonishing!

Because there were some editing issues, I don’t feel like I can give this book 5 out of 5 stars. I’m going to settle on 4.5 stars, though, because the content is just that good. If you love history like I do and want to be thoroughly immersed and engrossed in a title, this is the book for you. Be sure to pack your rations, though, because you’re going to need them!  🙂

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with    the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255    <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides   Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

~~~~~~~~

As you know by now, I am a somewhat of a history buff.  I firmly believe that knowing history- REALLY knowing it and understanding it- is the key to avoiding repeating the same mistakes over again. History is one of the easier things to manipulate, because as generations pass, it can be re-written and no one is around to remember and complain. (if you think I’m joking about this, open your kids’ history books and read about these events with a critical eye, from an American point of view……)

Folks that were around on 9/11 have a frame of comparison to the attack on Pearl Harbor; December 7, 1941, a “day that will live in infamy.” (FDR)

I am blessed to know a survivor of the USS Arizona. His twin brother, also on the Arizona, died that day.

If you have the opportunity to get to know a WWII veteran, take it. Spend some serious time with him/her, and record the memories. You will not regret it, I promise.

 

This was the first attack on US soil. There were lots of other firsts going on, too. FDR was the first president elected to 3 terms. The US was emerging from the first economic depression.

US war bonds were being issued for the first time, and Daylight Savings was put into effect for the first time, to accommodate a work day punctuated by nightly black-out periods, so the enemy flying overhead couldn’t see cities. Women went to work in factories for the first time, doing more than secretarial duties, mostly because of the draft.

And yet, despite these striking differences in generations and technology, I can’t help but to see the parallels in the government today, with the exception of unity and patriotism.

Read the book. Then come back and leave me your thoughts.  😀

Read Full Post »


Book Description

For years we have wondered “Where was Daniel when his three friends were cast into the fiery furnace?”  Now, with Babylon’s Falling, we have a chance to find out. Daniel of Judah and his friends are taken captive by the armies of Babylon. There, they are forced to surrender everything — their honor, their lives, even their names — to the mad king Nebuchadnezzer. Daniel becomes Belteshazzar, a councilor to the mad king. It is Belteshazzar — Daniel — who recognizes that the coming of Cyrus the Great will spell the end of Nebuchadnezzar’s rule.  It is Daniel who can see that his family and his people are freed to reach their ancestral homes. Babylon’s Falling is an uplifting story of heroism, belief and faith that proves to readers they can accomplish anything if they only believe. Mr. Collins welcomes comments at William1co@bellsouth.net.

My Review

I normally really like historical fiction. I’ve read some other biblical fiction type of books that have been very good. This title wasn’t bad, but it didn’t push any of my buttons one way or another.

It could have been a re-telling with details that left you hanging on your seat, waiting to see what happened next. It could have taken Daniel’s story and woven it into a different time period. The concept of using these biblical men’s stories is a good one; this could have been a I-can’t-put-it-down type of book.

I felt like the narrative was based on something else. At one point, I thought it might be a good idea to sit down with my Bible and read that as a companion, to see how closely the verbiage reflected actual scripture. The writing seemed  somehow canned and simplistic, as thought it was taking something else {scripture?} and “translating” into modern language.

This is the story of all of Daniel’s adult life, until his return to Yerushalayim, and his subsequent death (in the book, not the Bible). It has all the characters we associate with Daniel: Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego in addition to kings Nebuchadnezzar and Cyrus. It also gives us an appearance of the prophet Ezekiel, with whom Daniel was a contemporary.

Because it wasn’t terrible, I’m giving it 3 out of 5 stars. It doesn’t go on my list of favorites, but it will go on the list of decent biblical fiction reading. I don’t know that this title will spring to mind when asked for good book suggestions, but if someone asks me specifically about this title, I’ll probably remember it.

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the   publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book   review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The   opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with    the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255    <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides   Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Read Full Post »


Book Description

Sometimes the person you most need is the one least like you. 

Kathryn Davies is a bright young woman from a prominent Phoenix family. But after making a leap of faith at a Christian music fest, dropping out of med school, and moving to inner city Chicago, her family has all but disowned her. Kat’s enthusiasm for her newfound faith tempers the sting of their rejection.

When Kat discovers SouledOut Community Church, she longs to become a part of the multi-cultural church family. But her tendency to say whatever she’s thinking and her eccentric ways step on the toes of nearly everyone she meets—especially Avis Douglass, a woman she admires but who seems distant.

Avis is known for her mature faith and her reliance on listening to God more than people. Married to a kind and successful businessman, she is the principal of one of Chicago’s highest performing elementary schools, and a founding and active member of SouledOut. But the country’s economic downturn has thrown both her and her husband’s jobs in question. And Avis hasn’t heard from her youngest daughter in months—an estrangement that gnaws at her every day. Where is God in all this?

Kat’s flamboyant zeal for living a “radical” Christian life is a stark contrast to Avis’s quiet crisis of faith. But in God’s own mysterious ways, the two women discover they need each other in ways neither of them expected.

My Review

I really enjoyed this book. It’s a classic reminder of not only “Don’t judge a book by its cover” combined with “You can never know a person unless you’ve walked a mile in their moccasins.”

I totally identified with Kat, who spent her childhood trying to meet the expectations of her parents. Since everyone one else in her family were doctors, Kat was also expected to follow this planned-out path. Looking to get away from the grind, Kat goes on a trip away from home that lands her at a Christian concert event. Unexpectedly, Kat finds herself getting caught up in the excitement, and she gives her life to Christ.

As a newly minted Christian, Kat has no idea what to do next………… Connecting with some other college student at the event, Kat decides to make a huge change in her life: leave medical school in Phoenix and attend the Christian college there in Chicago. Making a change to education, Kat is actively seeking out the “urban” lifestyle- a lifestyle completely opposite of everything she’s ever known.

Along with her new friends from college, they begin to worship at a multi-cultural church that turns out to have its own issues……

This title is an extension of a series revolving around a prayer group that some of the church’s members were involved in. I hadn’t read any of those titles, but they weren’t essential to this story line. This is book #1 in the SouledOut Sisters series.

I really liked these characters. There were as real to me as any people I know in real life, without being caricatures. They were complex, and I am sure every one of us knows people like these in our own lives. We may even be struggling with what to do with “that one person who really annoys us.” 🙂

While the ending of this book wrapped up the primary story, it also left it open to a sequel.  I absolutely would love to follow these characters and see how they mature.

I give this title 5 out of 5 stars.

This book is available March 13, 2012.

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

 

Read Full Post »


Book Description

Disgraced dime novelist Kate Tenney fled the city that banned her latest novel for the emptiness of the desert. Answering an ad to be “heiress” to a vast cattle ranch in the Arizona Territory, Kate hopes ranching turns out to be as romantic as she portrayed it in her novels.

But what awaits her is a life harder than the one she just left. There is no room for mistakes on a working cattle ranch, and Kate is ill-prepared for her new life. She quickly learns that dawn comes early. But she is tenacious.

Having been abandoned by a string of men, Kate has no intention of ever marrying. But she didn’t expect to meet Luke Adams, either. Luke awakens feelings inside Kate she doesn’t recognize, and his steady presence is a constant distraction. She has only written about love in the past, never known it herself. But her feelings for Luke stand in the way of all she has to gain if she is chosen as the heir.

Perhaps God brought Kate to the barrenness of the desert to give new life to her jaded heart.

My Review

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The advertisement right at the beginning snagged my interest:

HEIRESS WANTED

Looking for hardworking, professional woman of good character and pleasant disposition willing to learn the ranching business in Arizona Territory.  Must be single and prepared to remain so now and forevermore.

How could I resist?  🙂

When the train dumps Kate Tenney at Cactus Patch in 1895, she begins to understand the pitying looks she got while getting off the train. A disgraced potboiler (dime-store novel) author from Boston, she replied to the advertisement based solely on her feeling that because she had written about ranches in her novels, she would have no problem working on one. 😆

“Hands on her waist, Kate glanced around with a growing sense of dismay. This couldn’t be Cactus Patch.  Please don’t let it be so. Never in all her twenty-nine years had she imagined such a desolate place.”

Those of you who know me and my feelings on the desert where I live will no doubt know that I was laughing out loud by this point. I absolutely could identify with Kate’s predicament and her struggle to acclimate not just to the climate, but to the West.

Kate lands at the Last Chance Ranch on the heels of a good number of other heiress wannabes, the longest of which made it a week. The town seems deserted, which she finds unusual, since there was supposed to be a driver waiting for her. It doesn’t take her long to figure out something is seriously amiss in town, and the sole reason for that wastes no time in taking her hostage.

This book is not heavy reading, but the characters are completely delightful. I was laughing out loud through much of it, particularly when Stretch (known for way he told tales) gave his westernisms for current happenings, like “It was so hot, the hen laid hard-boiled eggs, ” and “It was so windy, she laid the same egg three times.”  😆

Along the way to proving she is “the heiress,” Kate has a lot of struggles and struggles to conquer, like staying on a horse, for example. And then there’s the inner struggle she feels when she’s around Luke…….

Initially, I was going to give this title 4.5 out of 5 stars, because there was one particular story-line I wished had been wrapped up. Then I discovered that there is a sequel, and that there is a series. This is book #1 in the Brides of Last Chance Ranch series.

With that in mind, and plans to get the other books when they become available, I give this 5 out of 5 stars.  You won’t want to miss this one if you like books and characters that are just plain fun!

This book is available March 13, 2012.

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Read Full Post »


Book Description

David Ponder is back. This time the fate of mankind is in his hands. 

This is mankind’s last chance. Centuries of greed, pride, and hate have sent humanity hurtling toward disaster, and far from its original purpose. There is only one solution that can reset the compass and right the ship, and it consists of only two words.

With time running out, it is up to David Ponder and a cast of history’s best and brightest minds to uncover this solution before it is too late. The catch? They are allowed only five tries to discover the answer.

Readers first encountered David Ponder in The Traveler’s Gift. Now, in The Final Summit, Andrews combines a riveting narrative with astounding history in order to show us the one thing we must do when we don’t know what to do.

My Review

This book was some good reading! While it is a sequel to The Traveler’s Gift which I have not read, overall, I think it wasn’t necessary to have read the first book. There were a few characters that I assume were in the first book that weren’t really needed in this one. Not having read the first title, though, I have to assume that if I had, it would have been nice to visit these folks again.

The concept of travelling is really very interesting. Wouldn’t it be great to have the opportunity to visit with people from history, like Abraham Lincoln, and George Washington Carver (who were also travelers) ? The list of travellers convened for the final summit reads like a who’s who of great people in history.

With the instructions given by the archangel Gabriel, I had an idea of what the answer could be. It’s a good thing they weren’t relying on me, because I, too, was wrong. 🙂 The answers agreed upon and given seemed plausible, and the line of reasoning was sound. I particularly appreciated the information provided by the author at the end of the book, because there were some historical folks mentioned in the book that I was unfamiliar with. To have confirmation that they were real people has left me interested in learning more about them.

That being said, I’m giving this title 4.5 out of 5 stars, because while it was a really good read, it hasn’t left me thinking about the book since reading it. It also didn’t put me in a position where I didn’t want to put it down to find out what happened next. Because I am thinking about the two relatively unknown pivotal people, I’m giving it an extra 1/2 star.

Give this book a go if you want to think! You won’t be disappointed!

To see all of my BookSneeze reviews, click on the badge on the right hand side of the page!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: