Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2014


Of goodbyes. Really. Usually, I’m not. There have been a few times when ‘goodbye’ meant ‘good riddance,’ but those episodes are few and far between.

Sometimes, goodbyes come suddenly; unexpectedly. Sometimes, they come after a long period of languishing; dragging feet to delay the inevitable.

This episode falls into the latter category. *sigh*

I really, really did not want to have to. And I’m sure there’s a part of me that will always remember that sadness lingering, as it does today.

Ya know, another thing in this category is change. Change is not always good. I don’t mind change when I know about it; when I can plan for the variables. Sometimes, though, things change in the blink of an eye and there’s not a darn thing a person can do about it.

This episode falls somewhere in between those two poles. *sigh*

The thing that gets me, though, is when that change means saying goodbye, especially when you’re not ready for it. I’m not a fan of that. At. All.

We’ve been through a lot together in the last 17/18 years. I’ve shown my love; I’ve done my fair share of cursing. I’ve stayed up all night, making things right.

And last week, I had no choice but to sadly, say goodbye. ๐Ÿ˜ฅ

My sewing machine died.ย  ๐Ÿ˜ฆ ย  ๐Ÿ˜ฅ

A few years ago, I began having problems with bird-nesting on light-weight cotton fabrics. I cleaned. I oiled. I changed needles. I diddled with tensions. I read and researched until I was cross-eyed. And then I put it away out of frustration.

If you’ve been reading along, you’ll no doubt remember that I’ve sewed some curtains since we’ve been here, and I thought my sewing issue had pretty much disappeared. So much so that I made plans to make curtains for every window in the house, and got the fabric for the living room.

Well.

Ahem.

Last Saturday, I got my machine out because desperate measures needed to be taken, and in a hurry. You can image my frustration when not only was I bird-nesting again, but then my bobbin casing popped out and refused to stay in once reinserted.

After several hours of cussing and praying, it was apparent the inevitable had arrived. And I was not ready.

Looking at my machine, I remember all the things I’ve made- pillow cases, throw pillows, bed sheets, other bedding, curtains, more curtains, and still more curtains, and baby clothes, etc. *sigh* And I was not ready to let it go. I have plans, after all!

I briefly thought about getting it repaired. As I learned, anything over ten years old is technically considered vintage, and not only are many parts not made anymore, but if replacement are found, they are usually salvages, which means at some point, they are going to wear out because they already have some of the life used.

Plus, I really didn’t have time to wait. No, really. My chickens needed clothes, and they needed them NOW! ๐Ÿ˜†

Ok, really, it’s only the girls that needed something.

Ok, well, not really ‘something’ in general- something in particular. My girls needed saddles!

If you’ve ever done an internet search for ‘hen saddles,’ despite the feathery ones, I can tell you, those are not the right ones. Besides being for fly fishing, they are much too small. ๐Ÿ˜€

While I personally prefer to call them “aprons” or “capes,” saddles is more appropriate. As in,

“Move ’em out, head ’em up,
Head ’em up, move ’em on.
Move ’em out, head ’em up:
Rawhide.
Cut ’em out, ride ’em in,
Ride ’em in, cut ’em out,
Cut ’em out, ride ’em in:
Rawhide!”

Ya. That kind of saddle. :/

Have I mentioned I have 12 crowing boys? Yep, I do. The suggested ratio is 1ย  male per every 10/12 females. This is not to prevent the boys from fighting. It’s to prevent the girls from getting worn out.

20131214_095840

Jumbo, Silver Laced Wyandotte cockerel

My head roo-in-in-waiting (he’s not quite a year yet, so he’s not “officially” a roo), Jumbo, is a gentleman. He is very gentle with the girls, and they adore him. He does his morning ‘hello,’ his evening ‘goodnight’ and in-between ‘just so you don’t forget me’s.

One of my silkie girls is terribly smitten with him, snuggling with him on the roost when she’s not broody. ๐Ÿ˜† And he, bless his heart, tries to be accommodating to satisfy her loving desires. So far, he hasn’t killed her, but it is hilarious to watch, if not a bit concerning. ๐Ÿ˜†

Sparkles is another handsome cockerel, but he’s really nice, like Jumbo.

Sparkles, Silver Spangled Hamburg, and Jumbo, Silver Laced Wyandotte

Sparkles, Silver Spangled Hamburg, and Jumbo, Silver Laced Wyandotte

They often hang together, and can be found tag-teaming the girls during the day. We have no run, which means unless they are in bed for the night, they are free-ranging.ย  Together, they take the large groups of the girls out and about, which is fantastic to watch.

I think one of the real culprits, though, is Snowy, our Easter Egger cockerel.

Snowy, Easter Egger cockerel

Snowy, Easter Egger cockerel

You may remember the Mayhem in the Coop many months ago, which left both he and one of my Cuckoo Marans with cross beaks.

While his cross-beak is not as severe as Betty’s, it does interfere with his extracurricular activities, because he can’t hang on with his beak very well. This means he uses his feet *a lot* more, which is rough on the girls. And, he likes loves them allllllllllll. ๐Ÿ˜†

In addition to our three large fowl boys, we also have a plethora of bantam boys; 9 more, if we’re counting.ย  The worst culprits are my pair of black Cochin bantams, Bob and Snickers.

Black Bantam Cochins Bob and Snickers; Birchen Cochin Bantam, Coconut

Black Bantam Cochins Bob and Snickers; Birchen Cochin Bantam, Coconut

Despite having mostly large fowl girlies, I can say without reservation that these boys are successfully fertilizing the big girls, because my newest hatchlings have feathery feet and 4 toes, which means it’s most likely that one of these boys made it to home base. ๐Ÿ˜† And yes, while the mama is a Silver Spangled Hamburgย  {same breed as Sparkles; aka “The Polka Dotted Chickens”}, she is a large fowl bird, even though she’s the smallest large fowl breed we have. Make sense?

So anyhow.

My girls are getting too much love, and are starting to look a bit rough. The problem is that once those feathers are gone, there is no protection from toenails or spurs, and numerous hens have been laid open by super-duper amorous boys.

The fix is to provide them with some protection, a la hen saddles. I prefer to call them ‘aprons,’ myself. There are gazillions of patterns out there; most of them are free. Of course, there are lots of folks selling completed aprons, too, but because I know how to sew and had all the required materials on hand, I figured I’d give it a shot.

In a pinch, I had tied a scrap of fabric shaped like a bandana around one of my girls, but obviously, that’s not ideal. I wanted to find an easy pattern that wasn’t labor-intensive, because I had a lot to make.

In my wanderings, I found a thread on the BackYard Chickens forum that had a pattern. The poster originally found it on http://www.homesteadingtoday.com, from “Wisconsin Ann”.

It looked easy enough.

Hen apron or saddle pattern

Hen apron or saddle pattern

But when I got started, not only did I start bird-nesting, but then the bobbin case came flying out and refused to let me seat it back in, despite unscrewing the lever to keep it in place and then tightening it down again. The icing on the cake, though, was when my hand wheel got jammed.

Since you know I research everything, I asked on Facebook ๐Ÿ˜† , knowing all my sewy friends would help me out. In the meantime, I researched, and narrowed down what features I wanted.

I like a top drop in bobbin as opposed to a front loading bobbin. Computerized machines just leave more for me to break, with my magnetic personality and all. ๐Ÿ˜† That meant mechanical for me. I also like stitches, because even though I don’t use many, I like to have the option. It goes without saying I wanted the one-step buttonholing, because I do actually use that.

I found a brand that came highly recommended, but the nearest retailer was 70 some miles away. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ Then, because even though we’re in a much more populated area, it seems there are not a lot of sewing/crafty stores here. That left me with big-box stores like Wally World, Target, etc. The following day was Sunday, so I knew Hobby Lobby wouldn’t be open.

And, since I don’t really want to buy a sewing machine from Wal-Mart, despite the large selection (including Singer, Brother, and Janome), JoAnn Fabrics had one of the models I had settled on; at least online.

Thrilled to find it open on Sunday, I did a quick looky-loo at Wal-Mart before heading there. I was surprised to find a single brand in-stock; the others had to be ordered online. The one I wanted was in-stock, and even on sale! So home I went, with more fancy stuff than I really needed, and a DVD to boot.

It took me a few days, and we had some rain, so the chickie kids weren’t as active, which meant I didn’t get to it until yesterday. I made my template from a cereal box, and got to work.

This pattern called for heavier fabric, but I wanted to use cotton. I thought, though, I would try a few other things first before using the pattern. Using the general shape, I did a single layer. I also made the elastic a lot longer, because it just didn’t look like it would fit

FAIL! The general shape was ok, but too short, and a single layer was not going to work because a breeze would flip the fabric right up.

Several other patterns I had seen called for doubling the pattern; folding, and then sewing. I gave that a try and tweaked the elastic length.

In the end, I made another template from the other side of the cereal box, kind of sort of using the original dimensions. I lengthened the end-to-end length by about an inch, and added about 1/2 an inch to the side lengths. I made 4 of those, tweaking it as I went, and adjusting the elastic to fit some of the smaller, large fowl birds, like my Lakenvelders.

The biggest difference was that I doubled the pattern; folding it over on the neck line. This made the fabric heavy enough to defy the wind; but not so heavy as to be hot. We are in the South, after all. ๐Ÿ˜€

My total was 16; 15 are on birds now; another we’ll have to do in the morning. Initially, I read it would take about 30 minutes to make one. Yesterday, while I was still diddling with the fit, I was cutting and then sewing each one. This time might be about right.

Today, Iย  traced and cut out all the fabric ahead of time. Once I got to sewing, it took me about 10 minutes per apron. I will say, though- this are not professional grade. ๐Ÿ˜† Had this been for people, I would have taken more care to carefully watch my seams, etc. I knew I had to get them done and on my girls, so I was blowing and going. ๐Ÿ˜€

The fabric I had on hand was last used making baby dresses for my oldest daughter. ๐Ÿ™‚ I knew there was a reason I had saved it all these years!

aprons1

On that neckline, be SURE not to sew the elastic stationary. When you put the wings in, you’ll want to slide the neck piece to the side; particularly on the second wing.

The elastic piece was 10 inches for my big birds; 9 3/4 for the Lakenvelders. I think it probably would have been ok, but I didn’t want it too loose on them. If you’re anything like me, you’ll be thinking, “There’s NO WAY that is long enough!” but I promise you, it is. ๐Ÿ™‚

One of the first girls to get one yesterday was one of my Silver Laced Wyandotte ladies. pink1

pink2

Snowy in hot pursuit!

Snowy in hot pursuit!

pinkginham1

flowers1

purple1

yellow1

yellow2

I wasn’t planning on a fashion show, but there you have it. :mrgreen:

While I don’t like saying “goodbye” most of the time and this was no exception, saying “hello” to my new sewing machine got me back on track, and got my girlies covered before they got scabby backs. Totally worth it, in my opinion!

Because life is a soundtrack, I’m going to leave you with two songs that are stuck in my head. {Ya, can you hear that mash-up? ๐Ÿ˜† }

Not quite the Frankie Laine original, but I love me some Clint!

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShOiHPrwtHk%5D

And, because I can’t part with the old sewing machine….. {don’t laugh, you know you do it too! ๐Ÿ˜† } and of course, it goes without saying I love me some Jon BonJovi, too!

[youtube:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifm00JEjSeo%5D

 

:mrgreen:

Read Full Post »


1861. Bonnie Rose. Offered the opportunity of a lifetime and knowing she had no other choice for herself and her sister, Bonnie Rose accepts. wildwoodcreek

Where else was she going to find someone who could look past her shame; abuse and scars resulting from the her time in Indian captivity? And besides, no one much likes the Irish anyhow. What choice does she have but to pack up Maggie May and make the journey to the town in Texas?

Has she made a deal with the devil? How does a whole town go missing? Is she the witch he’s accused her of being?

Present Day. Allie. Basically disowned by her mother and step-father for following in her deceased father’s movie-making footsteps instead of going to law school like they want her to. Offered the opportunity of a lifetime to work as a production assistant. On an errand to the super-secret movie site, she’s asked to portray the lead role of Bonnie Rose. How can she say no?

Allie and her BFF, Kim, both find themselves working on a movie, the plot of which is mostly secret; the location of which is completely under wraps, under ‘penalty of death.’ Well, ok, maybe they won’t kill a person who leaks the details, but life won’t be real great for them afterwards. There is a price to pay for defying a major horror film maker’s directive.

Intrigued by the premise of the movie, Allie, with help from a library-working neighbor friend, Stewart, begins to string together the tid-bits of information she’s unearthed. Her working theory on location and historical figures proves accurate.

Being asked to step into the shoes of Bonnie Rose, Allie feels compelled to find out what truth she can, and to clear Bonnie Rose’s name.

And this era is not without a mystery of its own. Who is this cowboy Blake fellow? Why does Allie keep running into him? What’s his role in the show?

Can she and Kim make it out of a summer with no modern conveniences alive, even after both of them are kidnapped?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hoooo dingy. I love this book. LOVED it, I tell ya! I’d give it twenty stars if I could. Or a hundred.ย  You pick.

This is my *absolute* favorite kind of story- dual storyline; one historical, steeped in mystery and tragedy; the other modern-day meets time-warp. Fabulous.

This title wasn’t short by any means, but it easily could have been twice as long and held my interest. I especially love how the whole thing was wrapped up, with the former slave’s narrative on a scratchy phonograph recording. We finally learn what really happened at the time, and what happened after the fact. I won’t spoil it, because it really is *that* good.

I give this one 5 out of 5 stars. Do. Not. Miss. This. One. Seriously. Run and get a copy. It’s that good. I can’t wait to see what else this author has written!

I received this book from Bethany House Publishers for this unbiased review.

Read Full Post »


This is the Change and Cherish Trilogy which includes A Clearing in the Wild,ย  A Tendering in the Storm, and A Mending at the Edge. emmaofaurora

A Clearing in the Wild (Book 1)– Emma has set her sights on Christian Giesy, even though he’s close to her father’s age; twenty years her senior. Despite opposition from their colony’s leader, Father Keil, Emma and Christian marry. Perhaps annoyed they marry without his blessing, Father Keil does what he can to keep Emma and Christian apart even after they married, sending Christian off for missions.

Just when Emma thinks she’s finally going to get to keep her husband after over a year apart, Christian is again sent out- this time as a scout to find a new colony have a country away, in Oregon. The scouts are being sent out not only to find a new site for the colony, but also to prepare the way for the colony, so upon arrival, they have housing.

Emma is heartbroken facing another two years away from her husband. Finally convincing Father Kiel she should be allowed to accompany Christian and the few other men, Emma’s journey begins.

A Tendering in the Storm, (Book 2)– When colony leader, Father Keil, arrived and deemed the site the scouts had found and started preparing unacceptable, Christian is broken. Emma is bound and determined to find a way to stay, despite the departure of colony members following Father Keil to an alternate location.

With a fundamental shift in occupation, Christian, Emma, and their two children, carry on, although there is again some separation for Christian and Emma. When tragedy strikes, Emma has decisions to make, that inevitably alter the course of her life.

A Mending at the Edge (Book 3)- Leaving her and Christian’s home behind to escape her violent husband, Emma and her four children now find themselves living in Aurora, with the Keil family in their gross Haus. Emma struggles to get her home built, and when it finally is, her boys are taken from her to be raised by extended family. Emma struggles to find her new purpose, and as always, remains at odds with Father Keil.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Each of these titles is substantial; together, they are pretty long. I felt like the pace was a bit slow at times, and wondered what it would have been like to have a single title with the events condensed.

Book 2 went back and forth between character perspectives, which I’m not sure I liked. After reading the whole series, I think the Louisa chapters didn’t add really anything of consequence to Emma’s story and could have been easily removed without affecting the storyline.

Book 3 brought us a chicken. :mrgreen: While I appreciate the concept of a fancy, tailless chicken that was appropriately named, Araucana chickens, don’t, in fact, lay green or pink eggs.ย  A comment was made at some point that this single chicken laid a whole variety of colored eggs.

I’m not going to harp, ๐Ÿ˜† but I will make a few points.

1) Araucana chickens ONLY lay blue eggs. (They are also rumpless, have ear tufts, and *cannot* have muffs or beards.)

2) Chickens cannot- I repeat- cannot change the color of egg they lay. If they lay a brown egg, they will always lay a brown egg. The shade, or intensity, may on occasion change, and generally, they lay their darkest eggs when they are the youngest, and as they age, their egg color can become somewhat lighter. {Now, I know there are folks who are going to swear this is wrong, and in the first batch of chickens, I had one that I really thought had gone from blue to brown, but upon further observation, I only ever saw her lay a brown egg.}

It’s generally understood that ear color will mimic egg color, but with chickens like silkies, who have teal ear lobes and tinted/off-white eggs, this obviously doesn’t hold true. To get a factual understanding of egg shell color, go here: http://www.maranschickenclubusa.com/files/eggreview.pdf

๐Ÿ˜†

But I digress. Outside of the pace of the first book and the non-accurate chicken facts, I really enjoyed this title. If you’ve been reading along, you’ll remember that I found Jane Kirkpatrick to be one author I really do enjoy, despite subjects that seem less than interesting.

I’m giving this one 4.5 out of 5 stars. For more information and pictures of Emma, start here, and then explore the Old Aurora Colony website.

I received this book for free from WaterBrookย Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.

Please click and rank my review!

Rank this Review!

Read Full Post »


It.

I’m using *it.* ๐Ÿ˜†

If you know me, not only am I not prone to falling victim to fads, but I also research things endessly, which often puts the kibosh on something I might think is a fad. I like to give new ‘things’ the benefit of years of existence and research before hopping on board.

In this case, once I started researching, I learned that it’s actually been around for a while, but is only now coming back into fashion, as backyard chickens have become a new “in” thing.

I heard the rave reviews. I read about the supposed “benefits.” My curiosity was piqued. BUT. I remained skeptical.

I mean, if this was as good as everyone was saying it was, why is it not mainstream news? Apparently, I’m a bit ahead of the curve, because I’m writing about it, too, since there are so many who have not yet heard about it.

Seriously, though, I’m not reinventing the wheel. I’m not the first to discover it; and I’m certainly not the first nor probably the last to write about it. I figured, though, I would write and share my experience in the event anyone finds it interesting and/or useful.

The “it” that I speak of is fermented feed for my chickens. I know, right? {Go ahead, roll your eyes. I’ll wait. ๐Ÿ˜† }

When I first started reading, I read all the kinds of way to ferment food. I read about all the the various tools/containers/apparatus “needed” to ferment. I read about all the ingredients one “must” have to ferment.

And while I was fascinated, I thought, “This is definitely not for me. It’s too complicated; too time consuming.”ย  But I kept reading because I couldn’t understand why folks would do this work unless the results were miraculous.

And then, I stumbled across a thread of the Backyard Chickens website, that got me thinking maybe- just maybe- it wasn’t all that complicated after all. Maybe it would be worth losing a bucket of feed to try.

I mean, after all, who wouldn’t want to feed their feathered friends a super-food full of probiotics; one that makes it’s own new vitamins, and that not only makes their poo smell less and gives them awesome glossy feathers, but one that actually cuts your feed bill?

I love my chickens, but just the thought of a less stinky coop combined with a lower feed bill? Well, that was enough to convince me, especially since I read about a way to use a single container and have a never-ending-bucket of feed.

I read about two-bucket methods, whereby you drill a hole in the one which allows the SCOBY (Symbiotic Colony of Yeast and Bacteria) to drain out the bottom of the one bucket to be used in the next batch; etc etc etc. Not only did this seem labor intensive, but it sounded messy and involved. I am all for easy. ๐Ÿ˜€

When I read about a lady using a cooler, I knew this would be the method for me. She had hers outside in her coop, and a while later, she moved it inside because her SCOBY had gone dormant in the brutal winter temps. I knew I at least needed to get my feed fermenting inside.

I brought my 60 qt wheeled cooler into the mudroom. ย cooler I added my feed and ***water.ย  {***You’ll want to dechlorinate your water so it won’t kill the good bacteria. If your water supply is chlorinated, as city tap water is, you’ll want to leave the water you plan on using for your fermented feed- out in the open, so the chlorine can evaporate; which usually takes about 24 hours. }

For good measure, I threw in some apple cider vinegar (ACV) {unpasteurized, and yes, I know it’s better with the ‘mother’ in it- it was all going to ferment, and make new mother anyhow, so I wasn’t worried. ๐Ÿ˜‰ } I use ACV anyhow; I figured a few glugs couldn’t hurt.

And then I waited.

I stirred a few times a day.

I left the lid cracked so the stuff flying around in the air could inoculate my feed with all the goodies {this is an anerobic process in an aerobic environment, this fermenting and getting the SCOBY}. I knew that my feed would grow in size; basically doubling, so I was cautious and watched to make sure I would have some trying to escape. I’ve read of folks who used glass jars, screwed on the lids, only to have them explode from the gas build-up in the jar. {Fermenting food will create gas, so if you hear burping, things are going well.ย  ๐Ÿ˜†} I also know of someone else who is keeping her feed in the shower, in the event she has another mess. ๐Ÿ˜†

About 4 days later, I decided my feed had adequately fermented and was ready to use. 20131208_162208

In my reading, I read about folks whose chickens didn’t like the fermented feed. Surprisingly, there are people who tell you their chickens won’t eat things like watermelon or spaghetti, which blows my mind. But that there were some whose chickens didn’t like fermented feed, well, I think they were probably just picky chickens.

I have never had picky chickens, and I wonder if it’s because of their free ranging time. I mean, when they are out eating everything, something new is nothing to eschew. It gets inhaled in minutes, before they have time to think about whether or not they should try it.

{And while we’re talking about diet, I will tell you- they are NOT vegetarian in their normal habitat. They will eat anything that moves if they can catch it. Don’t be bamboozled by “vegetarian eggs.” I’m pretty sure that’s an impossibility, because you cannot tell me there are no bugs where the battery hens are.

My chooks have eaten moles, voles, mice, frogs, bugs, horse food, snakes, and prolly tons of other stuff I’m forgetting about. They’ll also eat scorpions and black widow spiders, too. The point is- they’re natural omnivores and should be eating darn near everything- and mine do.}

I did keep some regular food out once the fermented feed had been gobbled up, as a means of making a slower transition, but honestly, they never gave it a second glance. Now, when I take their feed bowl out, they rush me. On the one hand, it’s hilarious to hear a flock of chickens stampeding toward you; on the other hand, it’s a bit disconcerting, and makes me glad every single time that they aren’t bigger, because I know *I’d* be on the menu, too {Good golly, don’t let me fall, don’t let me fall, don’t let me fall!!}. :mrgreen:

Because hanging feeders are designed for dry food, I got the idea to try my redneck feeder, which is a $6 10ft vinyl gutter cut into sections with end caps on the ends.20140116_090403

I needed something everyone could eat from that would also be portable. We cut 4 sections; 3 of which we regularly use. I also leave the bowl out because even if it’s empty, they still peck at it.ย  20140116_090352

So. What have I observed in all of this?

DEFINITELY their feathers are glossier. My birds have always looked really good; nice, shiny feathers. But with the fermented feed, they are downright glossy, and they all have a gorgeous sheen.

The poo smells marginally better. It makes a HUGE difference with the guineas, though, which compared to the chickens, the chicken poo is like smelling daisies. So that’s another win in my book.

I have always had very healthy birds {knock on wood} so time will tell if it has made them healthier. I will say that they have weathered the surprising winter weather marvelously, although we are very much looking forward to spring.

Where I’ve noticed the biggest difference is in my feed bill. No kidding, y’all, I’m saving a boatload of $$$ on feed. I’m documenting so I’ll know for sure for sure, but at this point, I know for certain I’m saving 2/3rds on feed. What I was going through every two weeks,ย  is now taking 6 weeks. That is *huge.*

I’m going to continue to document and observe, because I think there may be something to the thinking that there is a subtle difference in between pellets {which I use for dry food} and crumble {which makes a mess and is more wasted dry, imo} because of the binding agent to make the pellets. I’ll update once I know for sure. At this point, there is a difference in volume in the bags, and when I use more crumble, they don’t eat as much. Because I’m using my winter feed mix, come spring, I can isolate and figure out if it was crumble that made the difference or if it was the protein.

One thing I have noticed in my reading is that some folks are convinced you need a ton of ingredients {like pickle juice or sauerkraut, for example, or even apple cider vinegar} to get the feed to ferment. I knew the theory behindย  the lack of need for these things, but hadn’t actually tested it myself. Because WE HAVE CHICKS!!!!ย  SQUEE!!!!, I went ahead and fermented chick starter just for them. I used ONLY their feed and water; again, left the container cracked to get the floaty air-borne stuff, and I’m happy to report it has fermented just fine, and smells just like the stuff for the big kids.

The biggest thing I love is how easy it is. Yes, that’s what I said; easy. ๐Ÿ˜† It is a bit more involved that shoveling food into a dry feeder, but overall, it takes minutes to make up a new batch. Once I get down to the bottom of the cooler and have just a layer there, I add my feed and my water, mix it up, and I’m good to go.

Because I have a layer of SCOBY already, I can see the bubbles {aka fermentation} starting as I’m mixing in the new feed. It’s that fast. Depending on how cold it is {they eat more when it’s cold}, a typicalย  batch lasts 4 days. I just give it a stir to mix it back up before feeding because there’s the drier, thicker, fluffier stuff on the top, then a layer of the liquid, which needs to get mixed back in. Scoop it into the bowl and take it out.

I cannot say how impressed I am. I will NEVER go back to traditional dry feed. I am pretty sure the feed manufactures don’t want this secret getting out because their profits would take a dive. But ya. NEVER. GOING. BACK.

If anyone asks you about fermented feed, you can tell them you know a user. :mrgreen:

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: